Books and Recordings



by Martha Hamilton and Mitch Weiss



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Noodleheads Fortress of Doom

($15.95)

Noodleheads Fortress of Doom
2019, Holiday House. Co-written and Illustrated by Tedd Arnold.

To read a Conversation with the Creators click here

School Library Journal says "Gr 1-3–The Noodleheads are back and as clueless as ever in this latest installment. To their credit, Mac and Mac decide to fill their empty heads with knowledge. They aren’t sure where to get knowledge, so they ask someone at their local library. Fortunately for them, it turns out that books are where knowledge comes from, so one brother checks out a novel called Fortress of Doom and the other gets a joke book. Some of the jokes predictably fly over their heads, and there’s a particularly funny spread where they can’t quite figure out how a knock-knock joke works. Since the jokes don’t pan out, Mac and Mac opt to build their very own Fortress of Doom using a wood pile in their backyard. When Meatball comes to visit, the trio have a tall tale contest with a surprising winner. All’s well that ends well, of course, and the brothers’ well-meaning nature saves the day once more. Arnold’s buoyant illustrations and the protagonists’ goofy dialogue are sure to entice readers. Part of the joy of the series is the authors’ notes at the end explaining the historical basis behind the Noodleheads’ foibles. VERDICT The Noodleheads tackle fort-building and joke-telling in this likable and silly comic. A must-buy for libraries where the series is popular. Reviewed by Gretchen Hardin, Bee Cave Public Library, TX

Kirkus Reviews says "Back for the fourth time, the pasta-headed duo keeps up the fun with their literal way of thinking. In an introduction, the pair visits the library and borrows some books. The brothers admit that they don’t understand the joke in one of their books: “What is the tallest building in the world?” The answer: “The library. It has the most stories!” Young readers of this three-chapter graphic novel will pride themselves on being smarter than Mac and Mac. They will “get it.” They’ll chuckle when one Mac is left to guard the door of the “Fortress of Doom” they just built while the other Mac goes to get something to eat. When one brother returns, he finds the other brother far from the fortress—but not the door. Fascinating information on tale types and folklore motifs used in each chapter is found in the authors’ notes, and adults can point these out and find other examples of tales about people doing foolish things. The last chapter features a “lying contest” with old frenemy Meatball, who tells a tall tale. A generous font, amusing comic-book–style artwork, the stories themselves, and excellent notes add up to a book that can be thoroughly enjoyed by one child or easily acted out in a readers’ theater activity. Very old, very funny stories made evergreen thanks to the graphic format and inventive casting. (Graphic early reader. ages 6-8) "

Noodleheads Find Something Fishy

($15.95)

Noodleheads Find Something Fishy
2018, Holiday House. Co-written and Illustrated by Tedd Arnold.

To read a Conversation with the Creators click here

* (Starred Review) Gr 1-3–The Noodlehead brothers, Mac and Mac, are back in this irresistibly funny graphic novel about misunderstandings and mistakes. The empty-headed boys go fishing after their mother pushes them out of the house on a beautiful day. Wordplay abounds, such as when the boys both literally and figuratively miss the boat. Arnold’s exaggerated artwork complements the hilarious text. Side characters serve either to trick Mac and Mac or attempt to help them figure out life. The series reads like an updated (and, well, smarter) version of Harry Allard’s The Stupids. The authors’ notes at the end provide historical context for the adventures. Arnold, Hamilton, and Weiss borrow from many international sources of classic fools’ stories, and the citations are a nice touch. Kids will feel like they have the upper hand while also reveling in Mac and Mac’s foibles, and they might even learn a thing or two about logical reasoning. Even Mac and Mac learn something by the end, but when it comes down to it, they’re still the same old Noodleheads. VERDICT A must-buy for graphic novel collections.–Gretchen Hardin, Sterling Municipal ­Library, Baytown, TX

Noodleheads See the Future

($15.95/$6.99)

Noodleheads See the Future
2017, Holiday House. Co-written and Illustrated by Tedd Arnold.

Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Award 2018 and American Library Association Notable Book of the Year 2018

Winner of the 2017 Aesop Prize from the American Folklore Society

“Mac and Mac are a couple of noodleheads, and the stars of Tedd Arnold, Martha Hamilton, and Mitch Weiss’s delightful collaboration Noodleheads See the Future. What is a noodlehead? A noodlehead is a fool, and as the authors explain, “tales of fools, also called ‘noodles’ or ‘noodleheads,’ have been told for as long as people have told stories.” Noodlehead stories appear in the traditions of many countries around the world, and the characters are often well known and beloved of the children in those cultures. They frequently share common traits across cultures too: an illogical view of the world, a tendency to take things literally to the point of absurdity, and a general good nature so that things always work out for the best for them. In Noodleheads See the Future, the stories are presented in a brief introduction and 3 chapters, each one corresponding to specific traditional motifs, as noted at the end of the book. Mac and Mac are literally portrayed as noodle-heads, elbow macaroni to be exact. In an overarching quest for their favorite food — cake — Mac and Mac cut firewood, have what may or may not be a near death experience, and inadvertently dig a garden for their mother. Along the way they have an encounter with a trickster Meatball who trades them some “magic” seeds … with unexpected results. Arnold, Hamilton, and Weiss make sure that Noodleheads See the Future is firmly rooted in traditional tales, evidenced in the substantial source notes at the end of the book. The real magic, however, is the enormously child-friendly graphic novel format, illustrated in Tedd Arnold’s signature style, that makes these timeless tales accessible to the very youngest readers. Children love stories in which they are smarter than the protagonist. The Noodleheads are going to be a hit!”

- American Folklore Society- Aesop Award Committee

Junior Library Guild Selection for Spring 2017

To download an Educator's Guide click here. To read a Conversation with the Creators click here.

* (Starred Review) Two thickheaded macaroni noodles prove the old adage: a fool and his firewood are soon parted. Fools have been called "noodleheads" for centuries, but until recently few have represented the term quite so literally. Mac and Mac aren't the brightest pieces of pasta in the world, but their hearts are in the right place. Here, the two decide to help their mama out by gathering firewood in hopes that she'll bake them a cake. As they are attempting to cut the very branch they're sitting on, a passing meatball points out that they are mere minutes away from bruised bottoms. When his words come to pass, our heroes decide the meatball is clairvoyant and demand to know their future. Drawing on and smoothly weaving together a variety of folk tales, the brief graphic novel describes how its obtuse protagonists single-mindedly seek cake, even as they anticipate death, purchase "firewood seeds" (aka acorns), and accidentally dig their mother a garden. Emergent readers will appreciate the simple text, short chapters, and comics-inspired paneled illustrations. Adults will appreciate the authors' note, which goes into some detail about each chapter's folk origins. Two delightfully dense heroes bring folk tales into the 21st century, and young readers are all the richer for it. (Graphic early reader. 5-9) --Kirkus Reviews

Noodlehead Nightmares

($15.95/$6.99)

Noodlehead Nightmares
2016, Holiday House. Co-written and Illustrated by Tedd Arnold.

2017 Children's Choice Book Awards Finalist

School Library Journal says "Kids moving on from early readers, especially Fly Guy fans, may want to check out Noodlehead Nightmares, Tedd Arnold's new collaboration with Martha Hamilton and Mitch Weiss. In a goofy graphic novel for the chapter book set, Arnold brings his bubbly artwork to a pair of silly brothers with actual macaroni noodles for heads. "

To download an Educator's Guide click here. To read a Conversation with the Creators click here.

Noodlehead Stories

($24.95/$15.95)

Noodlehead Stories: World Tales Kids Can Read and Tell
2000, August House. Illustrated by Ariane Elsammak.

2001 Parents' Choice Recommendation
2001 Notable Social Studies Book for Young People

(Award given by the National Council for the Social Studies and the Children's Book Council)

How and Why Stories

($24.95/$15.95)

How & Why Stories: World Tales Kids Can Read and Tell
August House, 1999. Illustrated by Carol Lyon.

Winner of a 1999 Storytelling World Gold Award
2000 Parents' Choice Approval
2001 National Youth Storytelling Pegasus Award (Special Distinction)

Scared Witless

($15.95/$8.95)

Scared Witless: Thirteen Eerie Tales to Tell
2006, August House. Illustrated by Kevin Pope.

2006, August House Publishers. Illustrated by Kevin Pope.
Kirkus Reviews says ". . . just right for inducing 'goosebumps, gasps and giggles' in susceptible audiences of any age."

Stories in My Pocket-Book

($29.95)

Stories in My Pocket: Tales Kids Can Tell
1996, Fulcrum. Illustrated by Annie Campbell.

Winner of a 1996 Storytelling World Gold Award
Stories in My Pocket-CD

($15.00)

Stories in My Pocket: Tales Kids Can Tell (CD)
1998 Parents' Choice Recommendation
1998 Gold Award - National Parenting Publications Awards

Children Tell Stories

($29.95)

Children Tell Stories: Teaching and Using Storytelling in the Classroom
2005, Richard C. Owen Publishers.

A new version of a classic now with a dramatic DVD of students learning to tell stories.
Winner of the Anne Izard Storytellers' Choice Award
Winner of a 2006 Storytelling World Gold Award

Click here to read the complete first chapter from the book:
Chapter 1: The Power of Storytelling in the Classroom
And Click here for a four minute excerpt of the documentary that accompanies the book
Get 5 college credits for reading this book. For details, click here.

Priceless Gifts

($16.95)

Priceless Gifts: An Old Tale from Italy
2007, August House (LittleFolk). Illustrated by John Kanzler

Winner of a 2008 Storytelling World Gold Award
Children's Literature writes "Husband and wife storytellers Martha Hamilton and Mitch Weiss bring to life an Italian folktale set during the glory days of Italy's monopoly of the Spice Islands . . . Rich, jewel-toned illustrations laced with humor make this engaging tale a perfect introduction to studies of explorers and the spice trade, and will provoke lively discussions about gifts, especially the kind that money can't buy."

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

Ghost Catcher

($16.95)

The Ghost Catcher: A Bengali Folktale
2008, August House (LittleFolk). Illustrated by Kristen Balouch.

Winner of a 2009 Storytelling World Honor Award
Irma Simonton Black and James H. Black Award for Excellence in Children's Literature awarded by Bank Street College of Education -- Honor Book

Kirkus Reviews says "Balouch's bright, memorable illustrations create a fanciful Indian setting with crisp, colorful figures digitally placed on a fabric background for texture. Teamed with spirited and eminently tellable prose, they conjure up a colorful, magical land where cleverness can save the day."

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

The Well of Truth

($4.95)

The Well of Truth: A Folktale from Egypt
2009, August House (Story Cove). Illustrated by Tom Wrenn.

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

To watch a video of this book click here.

Rooster's Night Out

($4.95)

Rooster's Night Out: A Folktale from Cuba
2007, August House (Story Cove). Illustrated by Baird Hoffmire.

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

To watch a video of this book click here.

The Stolen Smell

($4.95)

The Stolen Smell: A Folktale from Peru
2007, August House Publishers (Story Cove). Illustrated by Tom Wrenn.

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

To watch a video of this book click here.

Why Koala Has a Stumpy Tale

($4.95)

Why Koala Has a Stumpy Tale: A Folktale from Australia
2008, August House (Story Cove). Illustrated by Tom Wrenn.

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

To watch a video of this book click here.

Hidden Feast

($16.95)

The Hidden Feast: A Folktale from the American South
2006, August House Publishers (LittleFolk). Illustrated by Don Tate.

Kirkus Reviews says "Fun for telling or reading."

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

To watch a video of this book click here.

Tale of Two Frogs

($4.95)

A Tale of Two Frogs: Inspired by a Russian Folktale
2006, August House Publishers (Story Cove). Illustrated by Tom Wrenn.

To download lesson plans and a Common Core Standards Checklist for this book from August House Publishers click here.

To watch the video of this story click here.

Through the Grapevine

($24.95/$15.95)

Through the Grapevine: World Tales Kids Can Read and Tell
2001, August House. Illustrated by Carol Lyon.

Winner of a 2001 Storytelling World Honor Award
Bank St. College of Education: Best Children's Books of 2002

Books for Young Learners
Books for Young Learners

Mitch and Martha's series of folktales that are part of Richard C. Owen's "Books for Young Learners" Series.

To see a mailing that the publisher has sent out about our contribution to the "Books for Young Learners" Series, click here.

Two Fables of Aesop

($6.00)

Two Fables of Aesop to Read and Tell (book)

Illustrated by Bruce MacDonald

Part of the "Books for Young Learners" Series of Richard C. Owen Publishers.

How Fox Became Red

($6.00)

How Fox Became Red: A Folktale from the Athabaskan Indians of Alaska to Read and Tell (book)

Illustrated by Kathy O'Malley

Part of the "Books for Young Learners" Series of Richard C. Owen Publishers.

Tricky Rabbit

($6.00)

Tricky Rabbit: A Story from Cambodia to Read and Tell (book)

Illustrated by Pat Paris

Part of the "Books for Young Learners" Series of Richard C. Owen Publishers.

Why Animals Never Got Fire

($6.00)

Why Animals Never Got Fire: A Story of the Coeur d'Alene Indians to Read and Tell (book)

Illustrated by Bruce MacDonald

Part of the "Books for Young Learners" Series of Richard C. Owen Publishers.

Forty Fun Fables

($8.95)

Forty Fun Fables: Tales That Trick, Tickle, and Teach
2015, August House. Illustrated by Baird Hoffmire.

Winner of a 2016 Storytelling World Resource Award

Our publisher has just issued a press release about the award. Click here to read it.

The Children's Book Council says ". . . Young readers will be highly engaged by the fools, tricksters, and clever characters who appear in these timeless stories."